Intermittent fasting, the new fashionable diet: is it dangerous for health?

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Intermittent fasting, the new fashionable diet: is it dangerous for health?

Intermittent fasting, the new fashionable diet: is it dangerous for health?

For some time now, women's magazines, blogs and specialized websites have seen numerous articles touting a "new diet", intermittent fasting. If fasting has long been known, it has often been considered a religious practice; many religions described its merits, such as body detoxification, the art of patience, and the purification of the soul.
Several scientific studies, carried out during the month of Ramadan, have shown irrefutable evidence of its benefits, especially concerning the regulation of blood sugar levels and weight loss, but it should not be forgotten that these studies they have been conducted in healthy people, without contraindications to fasting and having benefited from a balanced diet and controlled by nutritionist doctors.

It was the British who started two years ago to study intermittent fasting as a way to lose weight, and since then the British Dietetic Association has started to consider this technique as a promising alternative. other weight loss methods.

Different types of diets including fasting have emerged, the most famous of which are alternating fasting (one day of free caloric intake and then one day of restrictive diet at 500 calories for the woman and 600 calories for the man) the 5/2 method (5 days of non-caloric restriction per week and 2 days of very low calorie intake) or complete fasting (a few days per month in which only liquids are allowed). Each type has its share of contraindications and potential complications, going as far as life-threatening, especially when it is prescribed anarchically by non-health professionals.

What must be remembered is that all the serious scientific studies conclude that fasting, with its different variants, gives similar results in terms of weight loss than other dietary rehabilitation techniques like diets. low calorie, etc. Several contraindications to this type of diet are mentioned, such as cardiovascular diseases or diabetes, and it is therefore necessary to refer to your doctor before any intermittent fasting.

Other studies are also needed to formally conclude the absence of long-term danger and to confirm the supposed benefits.

Following the various recommendations of international scholarly societies, it is therefore agreed that fasting seems to offer an alternative to the different classical methods of weight loss, but that its prescription - given its many contraindications and its risks of complications - must be medical and must be rigorously monitored under the eye of a nutritionist doctor.
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